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@FM5K

@Seijin

Well now you can share the blame with FM5K if ever play this thing. :-)

Wait a minute, I think it was your both your reviews that got me to play DA:I too. If this ends up the same way you should be getting a commission from BioWare.

@Kita

It was indeed Vah Ruta1, so I can't say for sure what you get for beating the others.

Also PSA, you can get more than one thing from the Amiibos, I discovered this when looking up what all the Amiibos give you and discovered that apparently the Smash Bros Twilight Princess one I have has a chance to give the outfit from Twilight Princess2. I hadn't used it since getting Epona since I thought that was it, and I missed all the daily chances to get stuff.

by edisnooMedisnooM, 25 Mar 2017 00:02

@The Mani Mani

Was it Vah Ruta (the elephant) that you defeated? If not, did you get a replaceable weapon? I ask because…

Anyway, I ask because I want to know for sure that defeating the other Divine Beasts also lead to weapons that can be replaced. More curiosity than anything.

by KitaSaturnyneKitaSaturnyne, 24 Mar 2017 17:04

Also been playing "that game".

Generally echoing Fap's review-in-progress (though I've ducked any spoilers like the last couple of posts).

  • The animations and facial rigging aren't bothering me too much. It doesn't seem much worse than the prior games, though the improved textures call it out more as Fap indicated.
  • It really bothers me that the interior layout of the Tempest doesn't match the exterior. Like really bothers me.
  • Also the Tempest is a security nightmare. This also bothers me a great deal.
  • I've at least found a few characters I like, so that's something.
  • At its best moments, it is a hollow echo of ME2, at its worst, it is DAI in space in the shittiest way possible.
  • The Frostbite engine sucks at backlighting. At least for me (maybe not universal) the character's mouths are backlit at all times, so it looks like they're chewing on a glow-stick.
  • Also positional audio appears to be reversed. I can only listen in on a conversation with my back turned. Fucking magnificent.

Still, it isn't a complete shit-show.

EDIT: A couple things I forgot to mention:

  • The color palette is godawful. Someone in BW's art team finally discovered the magic of scintillating colors (probably a WH40K fan) and can't seem to let it go. What goes great with purple? Green! Not!
  • The UI is garbage. I have had to look up how to do simple things many times. Worst UI ever in a BW game.
by Seijin8Seijin8, 23 Mar 2017 10:08

@ed

Anywho, sleep now, work in morning, then back at it.

by Fapmaster5000Fapmaster5000, 23 Mar 2017 04:05
edisnooMedisnooM 23 Mar 2017 00:45
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » De Facto Movie Stuff

@osbornep

Thanks for the write-ups, I've only seen Zootopia but I did very much enjoy it, tackled some pretty heavy subject matter and still managed to be funny and entertaining. Also the newscaster Peter Moosebridge is voiced by real life Canadian news anchor Peter Mansbridge. And apparently they switched the character out for more regionally appropriate jokes / animals in different regions. Kind of fun little touch.

I do hope to see Logan before it leaves theatres, I have heard it is pretty good and am hoping it lives up to it's reputation. Also I've seen all the other X-men movies so why stop now. :-)

by edisnooMedisnooM, 23 Mar 2017 00:45

@FM5K

Well who knows, if you give it a positive enough review when you're done I may even give it a try down the road. No pressure. :-)

I will confess that something has interested me though, pretty spoilery for a importantish quest though so I'll block it off.

Anywho, interesting to watch if nothing else.

Re: Zelda

Still ongoing, still having fun. The combat in this game is very unforgiving. Try and take on any of the tougher baddies and if you aren't careful it's insta-kill city. Someone needs to mod in the "You Died" from Dark Souls.

Got my first Divine Beast done, I do sort of miss the traditional dungeons, different puzzles especially tailored to whatever goody you find inside, but given that they want it to be completely open and let you tackle it any way you want I can understand why they went this way1. I do like that there isn't really an inside or outside. You just amble in and out, no load screens or anything.

Oh, and I found The sword. Still not able to get it yet2 but still cool. I especially liked how I was able to figure out where it was because of my prior knowledge of Zelda. Climbed a tower and was looking at the map and was like "Oh, I bet you it's there." and sure enough it was. I don't know if they might have had a quest later in the game that pointed it out, but I think if you had never played the older Zelda games you wouldn't necessarily figure it out. Pretty nifty.

Anyway still having fun with it, and I feel like I've barely scratched the surface.

by edisnooMedisnooM, 23 Mar 2017 00:36
osborneposbornep 22 Mar 2017 13:41
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » De Facto Movie Stuff

A bunch of short bits about some movies I've seen; some of these are older but I never got a chance to post them before because of life and whatnot:

La La Land: Struggling actress Emma Stone finds love with equally struggling jazz pianist Ryan Gosling. It's an enjoyable and sincere movie; I liked it but wasn't transformed by it. The leads give amazing performances (although I'm not sure how I feel about Gosling's singing), there's lots of fancy camera work and "How did they do that?" long takes, and plenty of references to 50s Hollywood musicals that I haven't seen and know nothing about. The themes of the film are super-familiar: Follow your dreams!! Hardship = Proof of genius!! I also wonder if there wasn't quite enough out and out song-and-dance in this film: There were a few moments, especially in the second half of the film, where I forgot that we were watching a musical, and many of the most-used and most memorable tunes don't have lyrics.

Zootopia: In the city of Zootopia, a metropolis where anthropomorphic mammals get along in relative harmony, rookie cop Judy Hopps struggles to realize her dreams and prove that a bunny can be a real cop. Along the way, she befriends Nick Wilde, a jaded street hustling fox always on the lookout for his next big score. I liked this movie a heck of a lot; for what is ostensibly a children's movie, it takes on some heady and timely material: The trials and travails of getting an ethnically diverse society to work harmoniously, and the ways in which our stereotypes about others can become self-fulfilling prophecies. No, movies are not going to stem the rising tide of ethno-politics, but it's nice to have a movie about animals convincingly make the case for our common humanity.

Hidden Figures: This film is about the role of female African American mathematicians in the early days of the space race leading up to John Glenn's history-making flight around the earth. I suppose in many ways it's a fairly typical Oscar-baity, middlebrow crowd pleaser; you will not find anything particularly inventive or surprising from a filmmaking point of view. Even so, I and the rest of the crowd was indeed pleased by the film. The performances, especially by Taraji P. Henson, were charismatic all around (and Kevin Costner once again takes on the role of the most American American to have ever Americaned). Meanwhile the writing is solid if a bit predictable throughout.

Logan: I think it's the best X-Men film save perhaps Deadpool.1 I think Cracked is overly reductive in claiming that the film is just a worse Children of Men, but there are strong similarities both in terms of plot and theme between the two films.2 With Logan's hideout being set in Mexico, Laura being from Mexico, and with border crossing figuring prominently in the story, it's pretty clear that this film wants to use its metaphor of mutanthood say something about immigration, minority status and the like.

Some quibbles: I think the villains were by far the least successful aspect of this film. Boyd Holbrook does well as the mercenary Pierce, but Dr. Rice seems badly underdeveloped given that he is apparently the man who both ended mutants and gave birth to them again; these seem like epoch-making events in the context of the film's universe, yet Rice himself hardly seems like more than a background character. And Logan's clone is just, well, kinda lame to be honest.

Another smallish issue: In the standard Hero's Journey plot structure, there is usually a "refusal of the call" sequence.3 In Star Wars, this sequence lasts a few minutes, but in some movies it seems to go on forever (i.e. Green Lantern, District 9). Because Hugh Jackman is so good at portraying Logan as an asshole with no hopes and no dreams, we can generally buy his stubborn refusal of the call, but it definitely pushes at the boundaries of what my patience can take.

by osborneposbornep, 22 Mar 2017 13:41

@edisnooM

Everything you have said is 110% true.

There's also the horrid treatment of the survival-stakes in the initiative. There are 20,000 human colonists. That is roughly twice what it takes, in an ideal setting, for a functional gene pool1. They also 'wasted' berths on families (can't breed) and homosexuals (don't want to breed), and brought Krogan (oh shit, resources) and Asari (genetic parasites)23.

This may sound callous, but it's body-math. Unless we have some serious gene-jobbing being done on a scale never seen in the series, that is not a sustainable colony. Much less colonies.

But ME:A just smiles and FTLs past. It is as happy as ME3 was grim4.


It's still fun. Stupid fun. DA:I with guns, in space. It's bad, yup. It's stupid. Yup.

Still having fun.

/I can't find the point, here. I thought for sure I had one…


Seriously, though, there should be a "get it out! Out!" option.

This is handling AI more like a positive Deus Ex than like Mass Effect, though. I think we may have a creator stuck on transhumanism, trying to write "the point" again and again, to get it right.

I'm not gonna agree, but at least this way isn't the worst crime, imaginable, ever. So there's that low bar, hurdled.


EDIT: found my point.

Please don't take my feedback as praise. It's not a good game. It's broken in many ways.

It's just an enjoyable, bad game.

by Fapmaster5000Fapmaster5000, 21 Mar 2017 01:33

@Delta

Good read. I've never really been a huge Doom fan. Nothing against it in particular it just never really grabbed my interest. That said this new one has garnered quite a bit of praise (such as above) so I may have to give it a try at some point.

@FM5K

You sir are a dangerous man, you with your honeyed words, are dangerously close to making me get hopeful about ME:A, and yet…

Since I've really got nothing to lose I have been spoiling myself silly about the game, and honestly it sounds like a hot mess of a dogs breakfast12. From what I've read they have picked and scavenged from the ME trilogy, with a sprinkling of Halo and DA for good measure. If it is at all accurate it really seems like they almost didn't try to come up with an original plot, just threw enough stuff at the wall to form an approximate shape and ship it out the door.

Also the sheer military grade handwavium at play here is staggering. They have created near Reaper level FTL drives, the equivalent of going from propeller to jet engines, and yet somehow this never came up. They built a mini citadel and four massive ships around the moon, and apparently this didn't warrant a news bulletin. I know the real world explanation, but the fact that they seem to be straight facingly acting like this isn't a retcon is kind of galling.

And a lot of the retcons kind of seem like trying to have your cake and eat it too.

"Oh we can't go after ME3 because it's on fire we don't want to disturb the perfect ending, so we have to go before."

"Wait, all that plot progress will be lost."

"Ok, now hear me out. But, what if it wasn't."

"Perfect, let's call it a day."

As for the synthetic AI aspect, I would probably be way more willing to give them the benefit of the doubt if I hadn't already seen what Walters and Gamble think of the Green ending. Anything they do now just strikes me as an attempt to placate and stress how great it all really is34.

On another note though I read that there is some mention to people knowing about the Reapers which expedited the AI launch, and that some people think they are all that is left of their species. Which made me think, if BioWare actually had the guts to go with a Refuse ending as canon that would actually kind of impress me.

Sorry if this comes across as trying to rain on your parade, and hey if you like it then more power to you, but at this current juncture I'm in no rush to run out and buy it.

by edisnooMedisnooM, 21 Mar 2017 00:51

I'm going to post my reply in the Awesome Game Thread because I feel bad abusing Delta's site by not posting in the appropriate thread. :-)

by edisnooMedisnooM, 21 Mar 2017 00:51

Update:

Fought a lot on first real planet. Companion AI is degraded from previous titles.

… and that says something.

by Fapmaster5000Fapmaster5000, 20 Mar 2017 23:11

Oh, it's more than a few weeks of work. If my bet on the animation technique is correct, it's not economically viable to fix it, not totally. We might see some better waking, some better gripping, and a few weird poses scrubbed, but for a total overhaul of all 12000 lines of dialogue?

That's the realm of obsessive modders.


EDIT: I should state, as well, that this game is not "great", not yet, but it is far better than it has any right to be. It should be drowning in its own piss, but it actually pretty fun. We'll see how that holds out.

If this stays on track, it should end just above DA:I in the Bioware canon: no where near the great ones, but far better than the crash'n'burn collection.

In many ways, it really does remind me of DA:I, too. They share an engine, an open world design, and a crafting system. They share a "mission" system. They also seen to share a reactionary bent, where they are an attempt to make up for the failings of their predecessor.

DA:I was obvious about it. Think of the common criticisms​ of DA2, as Bioware would gave seen them.

There's no free roaming.
Open world!

There's no real big-bad.
Elder god!

Combat is too fast/twitchy.
Molasses combat!

There's not enough content.
MORE CONTENT THAN YOUR BODY HAS ROOM FOR!

There's a reason DA:I, for all it's numerous flaws1, is often referred to as Dragon Age: Apology.

I think I'm seeing some of that, here. Remember how Bioware kept missing the point about themes, and kept thinking we wanted "happy" or "optimistic"? Guess the overriding tone of this game.2

I'll be interested to see how this plays out, and I'd my hypothesis is correct.

by Fapmaster5000Fapmaster5000, 20 Mar 2017 17:37

Huh, interesting review. I'm still wildly uninterested in playing the game at all, but hey, more power to the people who enjoy it.

I do wonder however, if the upcoming DLC1 will be as clumsy as 3's was.

I also love how the game's Day One PatchTM not containing animation fixes was big news on so many sites, as if they expected BioWare to complete weeks worth of work in a few days. I was sure surprised.

by KitaSaturnyneKitaSaturnyne, 20 Mar 2017 17:12

Things That Are

Structurally, the conflict in this game is quite different, at least thus far. Rather than try to repeat the Reaper-scale threat, the game appears to, wisely, tone down the malice. The stakes are still big, sure, but instead of "angry gods who want to consume you"1 actively ruining things, the threat is more Roseau-meets-survivalist-fiction2.

Instead of evil conspiracies, cultists, and Lovecraftian doom, we get a far more simple setup: People have interests, and the universe can be blindly cruel. Those two facts collide, and bad shit happens. The challenge is then in figuring a way forward, daring to take it, and (re)building civilization.3

Precisely expressed thus far, there is no specific Big Bad, but a series of challenges to overcome, laid out as such:

  • Dark energy appeared, and ruined the Golden Worlds while the arks were in automated transit.
  • the arks hit this dark energy cloud, and suffered catastrophic failure. They were sperated, lost contact, and placed on survival footing.
  • the leadership of the initiative died in this crash, leaving less-than-qualified people in the top roles.
  • an alien empire, focused on ruins in the dark energy zones, attacks the "outsiders".
  • The combined stresses lead to a mutiny on the main ark, which is defeated, but further fractures the initiative, and leads to scattered exiles, criminals, and raiders.
  • one year passes, and you arrive.

Everything this far is fixing shit that broke, and figuring out why it happened, while a vaguely transhumanist ai plot mingles with family drama in the background.

It's a decent setup, and I hope they can keep it from degenerating into mustache-twirling big bads.

by Fapmaster5000Fapmaster5000, 20 Mar 2017 13:09

Ho. Lee. Shit.

It's not trash.

Let's break this down, Otter-style, bad shit first, because I like ending on a good note.

The Bad

  • All those animations? Yeah, they're in there. The first 'wtf' face occurs in the opening cinematic, when people press to the glass to look out the window. It's only a split second, and I can't pin it down, but something was not right, and it was in the first thirty godsdamn seconds. QA, people!
    • Fortunately, these are relatively rare. I played about six hours (trial period is ten hours), and only saw about five of these faces.1
    • They're bad. The human director is the source of most of this, so far. In the middle of an intense scene, and suddenly… potato face. It's jarring, and will make you laugh, not in a good way.
      • I suppose, there is a defense to this, in that Shepard Face did come from somwhere. I think we're more keyed to it, now, since, you know… Witcher 3.
      • The face shit is only really bad if you look for it. If you let the game take you into the story, you'll only notice the worst of it, and not even be bothered by the normal crapping. On the other hand, once you see it, the 'magic' of the scene is gone.
      • I've seen most of this nonsense with the Director, as I've said. In the main cast, I've seen it most on Cora. It seems to plague the female characters more than the male, for some reason.2 I'm playing Bro!Ryder, so I'm not dealing with the worst of the Sis!Ryder mush-faces from the previews.
    • The other big animation glitch I've seen (probably more than the faces) is the Ministry of Silly Walks. Every once in a while, Ryder or an NPC starts walking like they're a marionette with a shit-filled diaper. This is probably worse than the facial glitches, because it happens so suddenly, and breaks a rhythm in the movement. You can't not notice it.
    • I've also seen teleporting background characters, but only when I first got to the Nexus. Haven't seen it, since.
  • The writing is… spotty. The story is good, so far. The plotting, as well. Most dialogue is good, but there are a few stinkers. Not enough to make a fuss out of, though, because there's so goddamn much of it.
  • The biggest flaw, not shown in the previews, is that the game just pretty much shits on the lore. Casual fans wouldn't notice it, but… well…
    • Somehow, the Council races built a near-Citadel-sized space station. Just built it. On one hand, I specifically remember this being something beyond the ken of the races, but on the other, it does shit on Starbaby's claims of supremacy, so I'll let this one go with a raised eyebrow.
    • They spotted the "golden worlds" in Andromeda by stealing a Geth-repurposed mass effect relay to FTL-optics the alien worlds. Space scrying, gotcha. A little hand-wavy, but I guess-
    • No one knew about this.
      • Wait, what?
      • Yup, this was some sort of crazy project by Mass Effect Andrew Ryan, with the (thus far) implied cooperation of the Alliance and Council high commands. Somehow, no one ever found out about this private sector impossible mission with Citadel-sized funds, stolen mass relays, and possible-war-starting-actions-with-the-geth.
      • … right.
  • Whoever programmed the flying/scanning requirements was too proud of their 'zoomy go-pro in space'. It looks awesome. The first seven times. There needs to be a 'no animation' toggle for this.

The Good

  • Mechanics
    • The combat is smooth. It's definitely a step up for the series, and plays like solid third-person shooter with RPG-mechanics and vertical movement elements. The multiplayer will probably be pretty damn great, based on the way single player handles.
      • Speaking of multiplayer, the setup is decently slick. You can launch missions in the campaign, some of which are marked as "APEX". You can then 'join' your own APEX missions as the team of rando-commandos from the Nexus, and play it out. Pretty clever integration.
    • The change in combat structure means that the shootouts are less "arena" than the trilogy, because the galleries feel more organic, and less telegraphed.
    • Although the game broadly handles like a super-polished DA:I, the movement, agility, and gunplay blow the prior game out of the water. I was super worried that the combat would be sludgy like that game, but so far, it's been pretty damn good.
    • The only real problem, mechanically, is that you need to scan just about everything. It works, thematically, but you'll spend most of the game staring through a scanner-box, if you're a completionist. It's like playing Batman: Arkham Asylum in Detective Mode: cancerous, but so useful that you can't stop.
  • The Setting
    • This is huge! Disregarding the lore-problems, they've nailed the best parts of the ME tone, better than anything in Three. The galaxy feels big, it feels wondrous, and it has the right mix of risk/mystery/cynicism/idealism.
      • The best way to describe this would be: two parts ME1, one part ME2, one part Serenity, one part Star Trek. Blend until smooth.
    • The worlds are gorgeous. The player models may falter, but they've pushed Frostbite in some very pretty directions, for both space and ground.
    • THEY BROUGHT BACK THE DARK MATTER PLOT.
      • This appears to be the "understory" for this game. Wish they'd done this a game ago, but it's cool to see.
  • RETCONS (the acceptable kind)
    • They've rolled the series back to avoid some of the more egregious 'space Jesus' elements, and the 'fuck you doom/gloom' elements from ME:3, in exchange for more nuanced (so far) approaches to these same plots, as hinted at in ME1 and ME 2.
    • The best examples of this are things like the Genophage. The Initiative launched between ME2 and ME3, so the Genophage had not yet been cured. The Krogan on the ship have it, but they are instead adapting their society to be more deliberately k-balanced, instead of r-balanced. No population-explosion nightmare scenario, without having to be the Chosen One.
  • RET-THEMES?
    • This one may turn sour, but it looks like there's an attempt to subvert the Starbaby's rant about organic/synthetic dialectics: the AI is integrated in the Pathfinder/crew.
      • In this, there is some reframing of the series, pushing it from Space Opera into post-post-cyberpunk/space-opera: cynically optimistic cautious transhumanism in space. It's like they're trying to actually address the implications of a game which clouds have lead to to the Green Ending3, without, you know… the conquest, enslavement, and rape. Instead, we get to watch people grapple with machine consciousness, blended consciousness, and what does it mean, instead of "you two, fight to the death!" and "get in the blender!"
  • If this game wasn't called Mass Effect, I would be singing its praises for its setting, thus far. It doesn't feel quite right as a Mass Effect game, yet, but it feels like a game that Mass Effect could have been, if Mass Effect 2 hadn't started with death/resurrection.
    • Andromeda is a private enterprise, and you can feel that, on a lot of the design. It's corporate-clean, with stupid shit in the cracks, like "at your current rate, you'll earn a Paid Day Off in… 570 days!"4
      • The board of directors, is dysfunction in only the way that middle-managers can be. They fight for territory, they bicker for divisional prestige, and, even though they all have the same goal, without a charismatic leader5, they can't help but undercut and hilariously fuck each other.
        • Examples include: stopping a flight ordered by another division because the cargo was from their division, and hadn't been properly requisitioned.
      • The de facto leader of the Initiative, by the way, is a racist Salarian accountant with absolutely zero people-skills. He's quite hilarious.
  • Plot
    • Decent, so far. I'm engaged, I want to know what happened to the other arks, why the dark energy hit this galaxy in the six hundred years we were asleep. I'm anxiously curious about what secrets my 'father' kept from me, what dark alley deals spawned this too-idealistic Iniative. I want to know why there was a mutiny. I want to found worlds.
      • I also love that the characters have not idea about the Reaper invasion. The sensor logs report an 'anomaly' in 2186, and other than that, they keep wondering 'why the rush?' There's so many dangled threads, just a little unknowing, 'oh, but for the grace of God' winks to the veteran audience, it almost makes a 'they all died' headcanon the appropriate conclusion, if for grim irony, alone.

The Ugly

  • Elevator rides are back, except now they're trams.

TL;DR

Despite myself, I'm really liking it. Every flaw mentioned is true, but I'm six hours in, and those flaws are simply buried under a deluge of content and other good stuff. I worry that this game will go along the lines of DA:I, and stumble hard in the final act, or wear out its welcome with endless radiant quests, but so far, it has been solid.

The best thing I can say for it, thus far, is that I meant to stop playing at 20:00 to write this review, and I 'just five more minutes"-d my way into another two hours of gameplay.6

I'll finish out my ten hours tomorrow, after work, but as of right now, this game is a solid purchase. I think the only thing that could kill it is if it content-pads like DA:I, recycles content like DA:2, or ending-fucks like ME:3.7

That's a long way up from where my opinion started, when I booted this game, a couple hours ago.8

by Fapmaster5000Fapmaster5000, 20 Mar 2017 03:43

@Kita

Lawl.

@Ed

There are a couple of things I've seen in the game's favor, and some against it. On one hand, I've seen more and more commentary (starting with Forbes) about how the review embargo was not just a bad idea, but executed in the worst possible way.

The tl;dr on this is that the game is huge, expands tremendously beyond hour four, but the reviewers (and early access) can only talk about (or see, for the early access) the first bit, and that the embargo effectively stops them from discussing anything but the negatives. In the article, the author implies either that 1.) the game improves amazingly beyond the intro or 2.) that the game is so awful it should never have been early accessed, at all.1

As for the "quality"2 of the animations, I've actually got a pet theory on this, based on information provided.

The dialogue for this game is enormous. The quote I keep hearing is: "three times more dialogue than the entire trilogy, combined". That's absurd, in a good way. Looking at the shitty talking-animation (even compared to ME1, ffs)3, it appears that main problem is that the animations aren't complete (no movement but the mouth/jaw, eyes locked on camera/character, heads dead-still). What I hypthesize is that, do the sheer scope of the dialogue, they made a "decent" animation program that would move the faces along with the expected sounds of the words, tested it on a couple of spots, and then turned it loose on the game. This mass-production animation would produce something like this, whereas an animator would add things like aside-glances, tics, and shifts in posture, which would make the game much less "Mass Effect: Androidema".

The problem with this, if this is true, is, once again, the amazing things it implies about Bioware's corporate culture.

Let's go back, to the lead-up to the third game, when the voices in the wilderness started to cry out over a "leaked script", and said the ending was trash-tier. Bioware responded, and stated that the leak wasn't real, that it was an old draft, and that the problems had been fixed.

They weren't.4

Disregarding, for the moment, the best5 parts6 of the ending, one of the gasoline-on-the-fire factors that turned it from "bad game decision" into "career ending PR disaster" was the decision by Bioware to shut up, lock down, and admit nothing. Denials, deflection, and radio silence, followed by "no, you're wrong".

Here, we see the same opening moves to the dance. Pre-release, groups began to quesiton the facial animations, and Bioware announced they were fixing it. That it was a bug.7 Now, as release closes in, we've gotten statements about "ship has sailed" and nothing is wrong.8 If this carries through to launch - if the story/gameplay aren't enough to gloss over the problems - I predict we'll see the silence, and the 'you're bad people' narratives start up, again.

Jesus. Christ. Can't you guys help yourselves?

So much of the "Reclaim" firestorm could have been prevented with a ME:A Culpa9. One "yeah, we screwed up, we were trying to do X, but it turned out Y" would have defused the majority of the anger. Instead, we got corporate speak, denials, counter-narrative, and a refusal to admit fault.

It looks like that ship is setting sail, once more. Instead of "hey, our game is huge, the only way to get it done in time was this animation method we automated, but we're working on it", we got… corporate speak and denials.

I pray to Yog-Sothoth that these guys don't go back down the Old Road.

It'll be even worse this time, because people remember the debacle10, chunks of the gaming press aren't in lock-step with their PR department this round11, and there is an entire other block of people pre-emptively angry with Bioware12 who normally don't care about vidja games, but are quite adept at making things incredibly shitty for people13.


All this aside, I do have some hope, as some commentators I generally respect have been pointing out, as Edisnoom said, that the gameplay itself is quite fun, that the setting is engrossing, and that the story is far better than the writing. If the game is as large as it appears, and those elements are good enough, then this might actually serve as a decent jumping point for a reborn series.

The tragedy, even in this case, however, is that Bioware got a name based on excellent stories, well written, with amazing characters. It would be horrible, in the most corporate way, to see them become just another competent shooter company, making unremarkable-but-playable games.1415


IMPORTANT UPDATE:

I just saw that I, apparently, have access to the early trial. I'm gonna DL it tonight, and give it a whirl after work tomorrow. I'll let you guys know what my official, completely-amateurish, opinion is.

by Fapmaster5000Fapmaster5000, 18 Mar 2017 21:56

That was one of the very, very few puns I liked. Congrats.

I will wear that like a gleaming golden crown until the day I die.

by KitaSaturnyneKitaSaturnyne, 18 Mar 2017 20:23

Doomguy has so much character infused into him, the over-the-top combat and guts become all the more fun. The game just embraces it's nature and goes full tilt with it. Gotta respect it for that.

TL;DR

PLAY IT.

by KitaSaturnyneKitaSaturnyne, 18 Mar 2017 20:22

This is a very late, but very good, review of DOOM:
https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/doomguy-knows-how-you-feel/

It's an interesting melange of academic context, political observations, and an astute sidestep of the icebergs so much games crit has run aground on in the last however-many years.

It is often assumed that a fundamental question in games is one of “agency” — particularly the player’s ability to make meaningful “choices” within a game world. However, DOOM is built with a different, and, I would hazard, more accurate assumption in mind: games work primarily on an affective plane. The question they ask is not “what will you do?” but rather “how do you feel?” And DOOM doesn’t think you’re feeling particularly good at the moment.

(Man, I do need to get around to playing that. Someday when I get around to getting through the gazillion games I have and have yet to play…)

by Delta VDelta V, 18 Mar 2017 03:20

@Kita

That was one of the very, very few puns I liked. Congrats.

And I'm totally with you on the schadenfreude.

by Delta VDelta V, 18 Mar 2017 00:31
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